Thursday, June 03, 2010

Ceratopsian Overload!


Last week, after many painful delays, Indiana University Press finally published New Perspectives on Horned Dinosaurs, which features a crapton of new horned dinosaurs, including the much-anticipated Diabloceratops (above--image stolen from Dave Hone's blog). There's also Medusaceratops, who is known from parietals and seems like it should be included in the genus Albertaceratops; Coahuilaceratops, a monsterous chasmosaurine with four-foot brow horns; and Rubeosaurus, a centrosaurine that looks like a leveled-up Styracosaurus. But that's not all: published in journals last week, we have an island-hopping bagaceratopsid, Ajkaceratops, and a Chinese centrosaurine, Sinoceratops, who has unique forward-curved parietal spikes.

So now that I know the book is out, I just have to wait patiently (PATIENTLY) for it to arrive on my doorstep. See, I ordered it like three months ago when it was 60% off. Remember that? Good times.

5 comments:

Ian said...

I feel like I should point something out about Medusaceratops. According to Ryan, this new genus is actually a chasmosaurine, whereas Albertaceratops is a centrosaurine, so it seems unlikely they are synonyms. It seems the similarities are superficial.

Anonymous said...

Not to mention that Medusaceratops was originally going to be the name given to the fossils now known as Albertaceratops, until Ryan noticed the horn structure differed significantly between the two of them and gave the original name to the one with the more Medusa-esque epocipital horns (there was also geographic barriers involved, leading to the one found only north of the Montana/Alberta boundary to be called Albertaceratops). Now all we need is for a new tyrannosaur to be discovered and named Perseutyrannus

TriPARROTops said...

While we're on the subject of horned dinos, someone tell me why so many depictions of Triceratops in popular culture give it such a small face and huge frill/brow horns? This must be a hard dinosaur for most people to draw, because they cannot seem to get the head proportions correct. The Jurassic Park movies, the Dino Crisis videogames, and even google image results repeat this mistake over and over. Examples:
http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/printable/triceratops-horridus.html
http://www.fossilsasart.com/desc_image/triceratops.jpg

Nick Gardner said...

Sinoceratops is amazing.

Mike said...

"Rubeosaurus, a centrosaurine that looks like a leveled-up Styracosaurus"

Isn't Rubeosaurus just a new name for Styracosaurus ovatus? From what I understood, Andrea Cau said this is the case on his blog:

http://theropoda.blogspot.com/2010/05/la-settimana-piu-ceratopside-della_29.html?showComment=1275221877774#c8939227696879769533